China’s Two Child Policy: Can a Name Change mean a Game Change? / La política China de los dos hijos: ¿Puede un cambio de nombre entrañar un cambio en el juego?

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  • Chen Guangcheng

Resumen

On October 29, 2015 the Chinese Communist Party announced a change to its policy of planned reproduction. The “one child policy,” as it is known in the West, is changing to a “Two Child Policy.” In the weeks since the announcement, various commentaries have vacillated between extolling the “good news” and bemoaning the short-changed labor market, the aging population, and the egregious gender gap that have resulted from the nearly three decades of population control. While significant, these discussions give only an eagle’s eye view of these macro economic and social issues. We would do well, however, to remember that this policy remains much more than an abstract political argument, and the truth of it lies in the real flesh and blood details as experienced by millions of Chinese citizens. Creating real change in society — as would seem the intent in the change of the policy — will take much more than allowing two children per couple instead of one as written in the nations law books.

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Chen Guangcheng

Universidad EAFIT (Colombia)

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Publicado

2016-03-27

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Guangcheng, C. (2016). China’s Two Child Policy: Can a Name Change mean a Game Change? / La política China de los dos hijos: ¿Puede un cambio de nombre entrañar un cambio en el juego?. Araucaria, 18(35). Recuperado a partir de https://revistascientificas.us.es/index.php/araucaria/article/view/2684

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